Trump signs bill named for Sen. McCain, doesn’t mention him

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US President Donald Trump signed a $716 billion defence policy bill on Monday that authorises military spending, includes softened controls on US government contracts with China's ZTE Corp and Huawei Technologies Co Ltd, and suspends sale of F-35 fighter jets to North Atlantic Treaty Organisation ally, Turkey.

The NDAA will support the Department of Defense's push to further strengthen the readiness and capabilities of the U.S. Armed Forces with a national defense budget of $716 billion, which raises service members pay by 2.6 percent.

Earlier Trump tweeted that he was "looking forward" to talking to America's "great heroes" and signing H.R. 515, the "John S. McCain National Defense Authorization Act for the Fiscal Year 2019".

"We resolutely oppose any country having any forms of formal and military exchanges with Taiwan, this stance has been consistent and clear", Wu said. It allows Trump to waive sanctions against countries that bought Russian weapons and now want to buy US military equipment.

In a hangar at Fort Drum, with an Apache attack helicopter as a backdrop, Trump said, "The NDAA is the most significant investment in our military and in our warfighters in modern history, and I'm very proud to be a big, big part of it".

Prior to the ceremony Trump watched an air assault demonstration by USA troops at Fort Drum.

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He welcomed back Maj. "Nobody understands how stretched our military has become better than the soldiers of the 10th Mountain Division".

The bill will introduce thousands of new recruits to active duty, reserve and National Guard units and replace ageing tanks, planes, ships and helicopters with more advanced and lethal technology, Trump said.

Democratic strategist Estuardo Rodriguez said on Tuesday that President TrumpDonald John TrumpAl Gore: Trump has had "less of an impact on environment so far than I feared" Trump claims tapes of him saying the "n-word" don't exist Trump wanted to require staffers to get permission before writing books: report MORE thinks of Sen.

So it's not too surprising to see Trump avoid mentioning McCain in his signing ceremony, nor to give recognition to the senator for his years of service, both in the Senate and in the military.

Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen is visiting the United States this month, stopping off first in Los Angeles and then in Houston on her way to and from Paraguay and Belize.

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