Easyjet CEO takes pay cut after sizeable gender pay gap revealed

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EasyJet's recently appointed chief executive Johan Lundgren has asked for his annual salary to be reduced so it matches the amount received by female predecessor Carolyn McCall.

His starting salary was £740,000, and that is now being cut to match the £706,000 earned by McCall, who has since become ITV's chief executive.

"I want [equal pay and equal opportunity] to apply to everybody at easyJet and to show my personal commitment", Lundgren said.

The move comes after the budget airline reported "the third-largest mean gender pay gap of any of the 704 employers yet to disclose their figures to the Government" under new legal requirements, says the Financial Times.

So let's call this an important start - both in message and in action - aimed at keeping the critical conversation going.

"We at EasyJet are absolutely committed to providing equal pay and opportunities for men and women", said Lundgren.

Mr Lundgren's remuneration package - including bonuses and long-term incentive payments - is "identical" to Carolyn's, the airline said.

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The company blamed the imbalance on the higher salaries paid to its mostly male pilots.

To fix this gender pay gap, the company is aiming to bring up their female pilot recruits from 13 per cent to 20 per cent by 2020. EasyJet has already gone further than other airlines in trying to attract more women into a career as a pilot.

EasyJet said they recognised "we need to do better". That is why three years ago easyJet launched our Amy Johnson Initiative to encourage more women to enter the pilot profession.

The company has set itself the goal of hiring women to 20% of new pilot jobs by 2020.

Previous year we recruited 49 female new entrant co-pilots.

Mr Lundgren, 51, began his role as chief executive on December 1 past year, joining from tour operator Tui.

Dame Carolyn left the Luton-based carrier to join ITV as the broadcaster's first ever female chief executive.

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