FBI Statistics Show Hate Crimes Rise in Minnesota in 2016

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Nearly 20 percent of racial hate crimes during 2016 were committed due to "anti white bias" showing a 15 percent increase in anti white hate crimes since 2015, according to the FBI Data.

San Francisco reported 28 hate crimes in 2015 to 37 hate crimes in 2016 and San Jose reported six to 19 in the same time period.

Excluding a handful of "multiple bias" incidents, the Federal Bureau of Investigation said 57.5 percent of all incidents past year were based on hate related to race, ethnicity or ancestry. The two largest percentages of hate crime incidents took place in or near residences (27.3 percent) and on or near some type of roadway (18.4 percent). It marks the second year in a row hate crimes have increased.

It is crucial to note, however, while this is the most comprehensive report of hate crimes, it is still incomplete.

"Hate crimes can and do happen just about anywhere", the Federal Bureau of Investigation said in releasing the data. "They not only hurt one victim, but they also intimidate and isolate a victim's whole community and weaken the bonds of our society".

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The stats break down the hate crimes by motivation including: race, religion, sexual orientation, disability, gender, and gender identity. There were 307 crimes against Muslims in 2016, up from 257 in 2015, which at the time was the highest number since the aftermath of the September 11, 2001, terrorist attacks.

Minnesota reported 119 hate crimes a year ago, up from 109 in 2015.

There were also 105 incidents against transgender people, a 44 percent increase compared to 2015.

Brian Levin, director of the Center for the Study of Hate and Extremism at California State University, said the increase in hate crimes nationally reflects an increase in hate crimes around the 2016 presidential election, a big increase in some large jurisdictions, a sustained level of crimes against large groups including African Americans who have always been the the top target of hate crimes, and a jump in crimes against Latinos, whites, Muslims and transgender people.

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