President needs to 'step back' on Mueller: Sen. Collins

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"The possibility that the President is considering pardons at this early stage in these ongoing investigations is extremely disturbing", said Warner, the senior senator from Virginia and vice-chair of the Select Committee on Intelligence.

Trump, facing multiple probes into whether his campaign colluded with Russian officials, has repeatedly tried to push the attention onto Clinton for her own Russia ties and on Comey for sharing information about his conversations with the president to a friend, with the idea it would become public.

Anthony Scaramucci answers reporters' questions during the daily White House press briefing July 21 in Washington, D.C. White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer quit after it was announced that Trump hired Scaramucci, a Wall Street financier and longtime supporter, to the position of White House communications director. "In a political sphere, I would caution someone to think about pardoning themselves or family members", Paul said.

Sekulow also noted that there is a "big academic debate" on whether or not a president has the ability to pardon himself.

"These illegal leaks.must stop", Trump tweeted on Saturday.

"We're not researching the issue, because the issue of pardons is not on the table", Sekulow said.

Trump's claim about the broad scope of his pardoning power was unfounded: many legal experts say it's far from a settled question.

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US President Donald Trump took to Twitter on Saturday declaring that he has "complete power to pardon", as his administration continued to be bogged down by ongoing investigations of possible ties between his 2016 campaign and Russian Federation.

News comes as reports are blossoming that Trump's White House is trying to undermine Mueller.

And pressed about the possibility the president could at least pardon himself, Sekulow said that's an issue the Supreme Court would eventually have to decide and one that Trump's legal team hasn't even looked into. Yet the Constitution grants the president authority to nominate both the attorney general and a special counsel/prosecutor. An individual does not even have to be charged with a crime to be pardoned, as was the case when President Gerald Ford pardoned his predecessor, Richard Nixon, for the Watergate scandal.

According to CBS News, that tweet was sent about 20 minutes after Fox News' "Fox & Friends" aired a segment summarizing a previous Fox News report on comments made by Gen.

Two of the people with knowledge of that process say those efforts include probing the political affiliations of Mueller's investigators and their past work history.

So calling investigation a "witch hunt" turns out to be a bipartisan tradition.

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