Sinn Fein says will oppose any deal that undermines peace deal

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British Prime Minister Theresa May neared a deal with a Northern Irish Protestant party to save her premiership on Tuesday but faced a tug of war over her Brexit strategy just days before embarking on formal divorce talks with the European Union.

After House Speaker John Bercow was re-elected without challenge, a chastened May quipped: "At least someone got a landslide".

"And the danger is that however much any government tries, they will not be seen to be impartial if they are locked into a parliamentary deal at Westminster with one of the Northern Ireland parties", he said.

The Brexit department spokesperson said: "Our view is that withdrawal agreement and terms of the future relationship must be agreed alongside each other". May's office issued a statement saying she was "deeply saddened by the tragic loss of life" but made no mention of the talks with the DUP.

Sinn Fein and the Democratic Unionists both agree a deal to restore a powersharing administration in Northern Ireland can be done by the end of the month.

"I can't negotiate with myself", was Michel Barnier's response, who's the EU's chief Brexit negotiator.

Ms. Foster will nearly certainly ask for greater investment in Northern Ireland as part of the deal, as well as guarantees on support for pension plans and for winter fuel allowances for older people.

"It is indeed our understanding that the agenda of the first negotiation round consists of issues related to the first phase of negotiations, which means citizens, money, Northern Ireland and some other exit-related questions", one diplomat said.

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Even the idea of an alliance is complicated, however.

She raised concern that such a deal could put the Northern Ireland peace process at risk as the Government would no longer be an "honest broker" in the Good Friday Agreement.

Sinn Fein, the SDLP and Alliance have all said that the Tory Northern Ireland Secretary James Brokenshire can not continue to chair talks aimed at resuming powersharing at Stormont.

Adams added: "We will oppose any deal which undermines the Good Friday agreement".

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn turned Mrs May's election slogans against her, claiming a link-up between the Tories and DUP would be a "coalition of chaos".

The UK's Brexit minister, David Davis, will open divorce talks in Brussels next week with an offer to allow the three million European Union citizens living in Britain the same rights that they have now, the Financial Times reported on Wednesday (14 June).

The EU will keep the door open for Britain to return, but only on worse terms than it now has, European Parliament Brexit negotiator Guy Verhofstadt said Wednesday.

"My preoccupation is that time is passing - it's passing quicker than anyone believes..."

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