Abby Wambach, Mia Hamm support girl after disqualification

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Mili wears her hair short.

"We tried to convince the organizers that she was a girl and what they were doing was wrong, but they didn't listen", said Cruz.

This weekend, Mili helped lead her team to the finals of the Springfield Soccer Club Girls Tournament.

Even though she is only 8 years old, her skills permitted her to join the 11-year-old team, The Omaha Azzuri Cachorros.

But before the final match, Mili and her team were disqualified.

"We showed them all different types of IDs", said Mili's sister, Alina. "They said the president made his decision and there wasn't any changing that".

Mili said the situation was unfair, but she wouldn't let it dampen her enthusiasm.

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Family members say they showed organizers Mili's insurance card, which clearly states that she is female.

Since Mili's story has made headlines, many have weighed in on the absolute ridiculousness of this scenario, including U.S. soccer stars Mia Hamm and Abby Wambach, who both tweeted in support of the little girl and her soccer dreams.

After the news of the girl's disqualification came out, USA soccer players came in support of Mili.

She has explained that she believed the tournament thinks she is a boy largely because of her short hair. Nebraska State Soccer would never disqualify a player from participating on a girls' team based on appearance. "Even if it was a mistake, they did not need to humiliate her or kick the entire team off the field".

Now the family is angry and Mili, she feels bad not only for herself, but that her whole team had to suffer. "So I don't like my hair long", the young soccer player tells Fox 8. Mili is an exuberant girl who loves soccer and her short haircut. "I won championships with short hair", Wambach tweeted.

As the story surfaced, two of women's soccer's biggest stars came to her defense.

The Springfield Soccer Club organizers declined an interview with WOWT, directing reporters to their attorney instead.

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