England's emergency units open 'as normal' again after cyber attack

Share

"We would like to reassure patients that all of our sites across our network are open as usual including our A&E department at our City Road campus", Ms Steele emphasised. And NHS Digital has said there is no evidence patient data has been compromised.

A statement released today by Hampshire Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust said: "Radiology services at Basingstoke and North Hampshire Hospital have returned to normal following the national cyber-attack".

At a hospital in Norfolk, eastern England, staff were told on Monday they could still only view x-rays in one room, while pharmacy services were being restricted as computer systems were upgraded.

Acute hospitals in Lanarkshire were affected, as were GP surgeries and dental practices.

"The work carried out by staff and partners over the weekend was no mean feat so we would like to offer our honest thank you to everyone involved".

The move followed the ransomware attack on NHS computer systems.

Major pharmacy chains organise a co-ordinated response to NHS cyber attack, based on instant information sharing.

More news: Severe Weather Outbreak Likely Thursday Night In The Central and Southern Plains

RSN chief executive Graham Biggs said: "This is an extremely worrying situation for rural patients and for small rural practices which operate on a limited budget". India is getting hit hard by such attacks as India has a large number of Windows users who do not have proper security patches applied and rely on inadequate internet security.

GP practices will be working to get back to full operational capacity and concentrating on prioritising patients with the greatest needs.

He highlighted that the government had invested £50 million in supporting NHS IT networks during its last strategic defense and security review, and insisted that individual trusts were well-equipped to ensure they could protect themselves against cyber-attack.

Carwyn Jones, first minister of Wales, said the attack had not affected their systems, partly due to the "resilience defences already in place". With everyone expecting a second spike in cyber attacks he said it was "encouraging" that no fresh attacks were conducted.

Several hospitals were still facing disruptions on Monday, with St Bartholomew's in London cancelling appointments and warning of delays to pathology and diagnostic services.

She said it was an worldwide attack with a number of countries and organisations affected.

Share