Anti-government protests claim another life in Venezuela

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He says he's chose to return to Caracas and join an anti-government protest.

Venezuela is still hoping that Barbados will support of the embattled Nicolas Maduro administration in an ongoing fight with the Organization of American States (OAS), despite a vote last month by Bridgetown against the South American nation. So far, there is no consensus on what the best role for outsiders is in this drama, but there are visible paths and sound suggestions that should guide it.

From Caracas, Venezuela's Foreign Minister Delcy Rodriguez described the Security Council debate as a failure by "the US and Venezuelan fascist opposition", adding in a Twitter posting that "Venezuela is not an item in the agenda of this body".

The unrest has left 43 people dead since April 1, prosecutors say.

Government opponents, accusing Maduro of becoming a dictator by postponing elections and seeking to rewrite the constitution, have staged demonstrations almost every day since early April.

Maduro has accused the opposition of plotting a coup against him with U.S. backing.

She said in a statement ahead of today's closed-door meeting that Venezuela is "on the verge of humanitarian crisis", with medicine unavailable, hospitals lacking supplies and people facing difficulty finding food.

Since the beginning of Venezuela's Bolivarian Revolution, with the democratic election of former president Hugo Chavez in 1998, the oil-rich nation has been repeatedly attacked as "undemocratic".

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Venezuelan Ambassador Rafael Ramirez strongly rejected the US bringing his country's political dispute to the United Nations' most powerful body and accused Washington of again trying "to interfere in our domestic issues". "We will not accept interference".

God0y Calderon said if Maduro wasn't managing the protests well it could have resulted in a full blown civil war in Venezuela.

Haley said the meeting was aimed at conflict prevention, not council action, and sought to put light on what is happening in Venezuela.

The government and the opposition have accused each other of sending armed groups to sow violence in the protests.

Monday's "sit-in against the dictatorship" began peacefully, but later in the day, demonstrators clashed with soldiers and police, throwing rocks and setting an armored truck on fire.

"We don't want weapons!"

The measure is meant to "defend and guarantee citizens a dignified life, to protect them against threats, to maintain the constitutional order, to restore the social peace that guarantees an opportune access to basic goods and services, so they can enjoy their rights in an environment of peace and stability".

Maduro fired health minister Antonieta Caporale last week after her ministry released figures showing infant deaths soared 30 percent past year.

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