Celebrate Earth Day by Marching for Science in St. Pete

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Not long ago we used to assume that scientific fact was sacrosanct - basically above and beyond "politics".

As the Washington Post reported in March, Trump's budget proposal "breaks with a history of bipartisan support for federally funded science".

Lydia Villa-Komaroff, a molecular cellular biologist and honorary national co-chair of the March for Science, said the problem is not new, and that federal support for research has been declining since the 1960s. Others are skeptical and scrutinize the intentions of a demonstration that could force researchers into a questionable position as political activists.

Participants cite myriad reasons for their involvement in the march, including threats from President Donald Trump's administration to cut grant funding.

And March for Science Merced will run from 10 to noon, beginning at Court House Square Park, West 21st Street between M and O streets. An executive order signed in March rolls back at least six of former President Obama's executive orders that aimed to curb climate change. On Earth Day, marchers will demonstrate that they are not about to abandon their values.

The organizers have worked to ensure that the events associated with the Washington D.C. march are accessible. "I don't think we should see this as a one-off event".

But critics condemn the project as problematic political enthusiasm. The public also believes that good policy and regulatory decisions should be grounded in science and free from political interference. "The real objective is left behind, which is simply not a proper way to represent sciences".

"Initially, the organizers themselves weren't quite sure what message they wanted to convey with this event". Smog and air pollution clogged many major cities and people wore masks.

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The smell of worry coming off the scientific community in 2017 is as real as gasoline.

"Now, more than ever, the public and scientists here and globally need to stand together to defend science and science-based policy making". "The march symbolizes a response to the rejection of scientific principles exhibited by large groups in this country". At about 2 p.m., attendees will march toward the U.S. Capitol.

Trump and his team, including Scott Pruitt, the administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency who has challenged scientific findings showing a connection between human activity and global warming, are being "totally irresponsible" with their approach to climate change, Lentakis said. Even if you're overseas, there are many countries participating.

Caroline Weinberg, a co-chair for the march, has a different perspective. "We don't want it to happen again". "The benefits to humanity are so important and worth fighting for".

"We are in an era in which the way that people structure their beliefs around science is of concern", Lynn said. "It's not going to impact the Trump administration in any way". Rather make a simple change, like buying a reusable water bottle for each member of your family instead of buying a case of plastic bottles that get thrown out each week, and take years to decompose in a landfill. For Young, it's the voters scientists have to reach out to, because they could make a difference in years to come. That kicks off a week of action, culminating in the People's Climate March on April 29, also focused on Washington but with satellite marches throughout the world.

Diane Lentakis, an organizer with the Connecticut Sierra Club and climate advocacy group 350 Connecticut, is helping to coordinate about a half-dozen buses from Connecticut to D.C. for the People's Climate March. "We hope to break down the barriers between scientists and their communities, encouraging a dialogue and engendering greater trust".

Chicago's March for Science, scheduled for Earth Day on April 22, will protest these cuts and celebrate science, joining hundreds of marches throughout the world on the same date.

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